Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Let us rise up tonight with a greater readiness. Let us stand with a greater determination. And let us move on in these powerful days, these days of challenge to make America what it ought to be. We have an opportunity to make America a better nation..."”

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
I've Been to the Mountaintop Speech
Memphis, Tennessee
Washington, D.C.
April 3, 1968

 
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. image

Celebrating Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Monday, January 17, 2011

Sponsored by the Multicultural Multiracial Community Council of Farmington/Farmington Hills including the Farmington Community Library, Farmington Public Schools, and Cities of Farmington and Farmington Hills.

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On Monday, January 17, 2011:

All events at the Main Library take place in the Auditorium,
unless otherwise noted.

  • 9:30 a.m.: Walk from Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 28000 New Market Rd. (west of Dunckel Middle School) to the Main Library, 32737 W. Twelve Mile Rd. (a one-third mile walk)—Refreshments will be served in the Library Auditorium.

  • 10:15 a.m.: East Middle School Choir

      Welcome / Words from Area Officials

  • 10:45 a.m.: Josh White, Jr. "I not me, who? If not now, when?"—The life and story of my father, Josh White.

  • 11:15 a.m.: Sharing from the Audience

  • 11:30 a.m.: T. Miller, nationally-acclaimed poet extraordinaire

      Give back through a community service project in Conference Room A (ongoing throughout the day): valentines for Seniors and personal hygiene kits for the South Oakland Shelter

  • 1:00 p.m.: Storyteller Rosie Chapman presents a re-enactment of Rosa Parks and the Civil rights Movement

  • 2:00 p.m.: Performance by Harrison High School Dance Company

      Give back through a community service project in Conference Room A (ongoing throughout the day): valentines for Seniors and personal hygiene kits for the South Oakland Shelter

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Exhibits

At the Main Library during normal open hours.

Children’s Craft Activities (Lower Level—Children’s Program Room)


The Harlem Renaissance Project
Main Library, Jan. 17–Feb. 11, 2011

Harlem Renaissance ProjectThe era of the Harlem Renaissance encouraged African-Americans to celebrate their heritage. This African American literary, musical and art movement in the uptown Manhattan neighborhood of Harlem in the mid- and late-1920s developed greatly from post-World War I emigration from the South, to become the economic, political, and cultural center of black America. The writers, painters, and sculptors of the Harlem Renaissance celebrated the cultural traditions of African-Americans. You will be moved and inspired by the words of Langston Hughes and other writers of the Harlem Renaissance.




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African American Artists from the Arts League of Michigan
(Main Level—Nonfiction Area and Fiction Display Case)


This photographic exhibit from the Arts League of Michigan highlights the culture of Detroit.


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., African American History and Peace Displays From Farmington Public Schools
(Main Level—Fiction Area)

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