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Comprehensive Law Sites

Annotated hypertext guide to legal sources worldwide (including U.S.) was created by the U.S. Law Library of Congress. The Library of Congress began its existence in 1801 essentially as a collection of law books. But in 1832, Congress ordered the 2,011 law books of the Library of Congress separated from its general collection, and the Law Library of Congress was thereby established. Its mission is to provide research and legal information to the U.S. Congress as well as to U.S. Federal Courts and Executive Agencies, and to offer reference services to the public. To accomplish this mission, it has created the world's largest collection of law books and other legal resources from all countries, and now moves into the age of digitized information with online databases and guides to legal information worldwide. This site provides links to high-quality sources of information on law and government that are available online without charge

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A very good resource maintained by the School of Information at U.of M.
From the Marion Gould Gallagher Law School at the University of Washington comes this collection of websites providing legal information and materials (including laws, bills, court opinions, and related documents) and/or links to legal material. Most of these sites are freely available to all users with Internet access. Some sites are UW Restricted, that is, available to University of Washington faculty, students, and staff and visitors to UW Libraries.
Information about and links to employment and labor law topics, from the point of view of both employer and employee.

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Provides law links on a wide variety of legal topics in a single-page format, including state and federal law, along with government agencies.
LegalEngine was developed as an online legal gateway that summarizes the most important state and federal law related links in a comprehensive and easy to navigate legal meta-search index. LegalEngine:s use is completely free to the public at large and is without any commercial purposes.
This Cornell Law School web site is outstanding, for information and links, as to wide ranging aspects of the law. However, remember that various parts of the law may be different in each state. This site has won numerous awards: its authors correctly guessed there were millions of people out there who needed to know—and understand—U.S. laws and court decisions. "The legal information industry in the U.S. in the mid–'90s had focused totally on judges and lawyers and hadn't paid attention to the information needs of others," explained Peter Martin, the Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law t Cornell, and a major author of the LII site.
This site is not comprehensive, since it is a limited no charge subset of a massive for-fee LEXIS Database. Nonetheless, it is rich in content, offerings free Case Law searching, over 6,000 free legal forms, and a rich set on links to other internet legal resources as well as to the pricey LEXIS database.

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Selections by Law Librarians; this Site contains resources that will assist your library users in legal research, accessing federal, state and local laws, finding information on a variety of legal areas such as bankruptcy, divorce, consumer issues and more.
The Documents Center is a central reference and referral point for government information, whether local, state, federal, foreign or international. It offers a categorized menu with direct links to government sites by branch of government; specific laws, plus the CFR, Federal Register, U.S. Code and Constitution; Michigan governmental sites; foreign government and international organization websites.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Directories and Bar Associations

Lists of law firms on the Internet, law library catalogs, and many more legal research links are provided here.
News for the legal professionals, links to a list of accredited law schools, a lawyer locator and a Consumer's Guide to Legal Help on the Internet. This site is searchable, and provides a Lawyer Locator—a searchable directory for over 900,000 attorneys and firms, as well as a Directory of Lawyer Disciplinary Agencies for all states.
United States Government Printing Office, newest edition This is a combination biographical and directory-type tool. Its contents include biographical information on members of Congress, committees, committee assignments, the Executive Branch, the Judiciary, administrative or legislative assistants and secretaries, the District of Columbia, international organizations, diplomatic representatives and consular offices, press representatives and services, statistical information, maps of congressional districts, and an index of individual names. Also available in print at the Information Desk.
Listing of United States law schools with links to their web sites from the Association of American Law Schools

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This Cornell Law School web site is outstanding, for information and links, as to wide ranging aspects of the law. However, remember that various parts of the law may be different in each state. This site has won numerous awards: its authors correctly guessed there were millions of people out there who needed to know—and understand—U.S. laws and court decisions. "The legal information industry in the U.S. in the mid–'90s had focused totally on judges and lawyers and hadn't paid attention to the information needs of others," explained Peter Martin, the Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law t Cornell, and a major author of the LII site.
This site is not comprehensive, since it is a limited, no-charge subset of the massive for-fee LEXIS Database. Nonetheless, it is rich in content, offerings free Case Law searching, over 6,000 free legal forms, and a rich set on links to other internet legal resources as well as to the pricey LEXIS database.
Martindale-Hubbell's Locate a Lawyer searches by practice and/or geographic area, by name or corporate law department. Attorneys and law firms are listed from around the world. State Bar Association profiles, plus a vendors and consultants section are included. FCL also holds the multi-volume print edition. The online version lacks the summaries of state laws and model codes that the print edition offers.
A county law library or law school library will have more legal material than the community libraries on this list. The two closest comprehensive collection law libraries, open to the public, are the Wayne State University Law Library and Oakland County Law Library. The knowledgeable Librarians are the greatest asset of such facilities.

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This is the official directory and legislative manual for the State. It is rich in historical facts, and filled with information about elected and appointed state officials, Michigan's constitutional election data for national and state elections, state departments and agencies, the state judiciary with some biographical data, and general information on the organization of the state's courts. Also available in print at the Information Desk.
Provides information about Oakland County lawyers and some helpful legal links. The "Public Services" and "Legal Listings" tabs are the most useful. Offers a Speakers Bureau and a Lawyers Referral Service.
Links to all courts (circuit, district, probate, and friend of the court) in Oakland County
Under Public Resources there are links to Legal Aid, Attorney Grievance, Lawyer Referral, and an updated online Members Directory. Links of Interest takes you to many Internet legal sites.
This site is the online equivalent of the annual publication that provides information on the agencies of the executive, judicial, and legislative branches of the Federal government. Also included are details about boards, commissions, committees, quasi-official agencies and organizations in which the United States participates. Each agency entry contains a summary of the agency's purpose and general role, a description of its programs and activities, names and titles of major officials, and a list of sources of information. Many entries also provide organization charts. This title also contains a section on terminated or transferred agencies. Current edition is also available in print at the Information Desk.

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The Government Innformation Center is a central reference and referral point for government information, whether local, state, federal, foreign or international. It offers a categorized menu with direct links to government sites by branch of government; specific laws, plus the CFR, Federal Register, U.S. Code and Constitution; Michigan governmental sites; foreign government and international organization websites.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Federal Law

The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is a codification of the general and permanent rules that elaborate upon and set rules for the interpretation, effectuation, and administration of federal statutes. These regulations are first published in the Federal Register by the Executive departments and agencies of the Federal Government. The CFR can be searched by keyword and by sections.
Key documents such as the Articles of Confederation, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights can be accessed here, as well as links to Congressional legislation, Public Laws, the U.S, Code, Supreme Court Decisions, et al.
Describes bankruptcy law and regulations.
This site provides access to decisions of the Federal Courts of Appeal, U.S. District Courts, Tax Court, Bankruptcy Court, and other courts of special federal jurisdiction. There are significant time limits as to how far back decisions go, but print versions are available, without time limits, at the Wayne State University and Oakland County law libraries, to which the general public is allowed access.
  • Cornell Law School Legal Information Institute's U.S. Code
The U.S. Code interfiles all the session laws passed by Congress under topical Titles. Cornell University's Legal Information Institute (LII) server offers the latest version of the U.S. Code available from the U.S. House of Representatives. The code is searchable by title, section, popular name or keywords. From the LII home page you can also access federal and state court decisions, state statutes, the CFR and more.

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This federal agency administers and is in charge of the judicial and administrative enforcement of civil rights laws. The web site contains information for employers and employees.
Maintained by the Federal Courts' Agency for Research and Continuing Education. Among many other resources, this site offers a federal judicial biographical database Federal Judicial History containing the service record and biographical information for all judges who have served on the U.S. District Courts, U.S. Circuit Courts, U.S. Courts of Appeals, and the Supreme Court since 1789
Choose Links to select one of the federal circuits and find links to U.S. Courts of Appeal, U.S. Bankruptcy Courts, U.S. District Courts, U.S. Tax Court, Court of Federal Claims, Court of Veterans Appeals and the Court of International Trade.
These are federal court rules. Individual federal courts may also have local rules.

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The U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) provides free access to over 1,000 databases of Federal Government information and law products. Here you can follow links to Federal agency files, the CFR & Federal Register, the Congressional Record, the U.S. Code, plus other Congressional documents, and much more. Farmington Community Library will have a local version of this available from our own server in the next few months.
Information about immigration laws and regulations.
Information about patent and trademark law and procedures. See also our Patents, Trademarks & Copyright page for further resources
Access to material about social security, including disability benefits. Persons with disabilities, who are not of retirement age, may still be entitled to monthly social security benefits with limited health care coverage.
  • THOMAS: Legislative Information on the Internet
The Library of Congress provides this database for quick access to what's happening in Congress: bill summaries and status, plus text, the Congressional Record, House & Senate Committee information, voting records, and Public Laws, from the 93rd Congress (1973–1974) to the present. Searching by number, keyword or phrase is available.
This official U.S. Supreme Court site offers general information about the Court, its rules, and case handling guides. Recent slip opinions, special notices, the Court's schedules and calendars are all accessible from this site.

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A variety of Internet sites are offered here to access historical Supreme Court decisions.
Access to the Constitution, but without references to court cases that interpret it.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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International Law

This site provides a comprehensive compilation of links to freely accessible on-line sources of law for the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
The ASIL Guide to Electronic Resources for International Law is a development project of the American Society of International Law. A user-friendly feature of the Guide is a Quick Links option which accesses a list of all of the links for each section of the Guide as well as the full text of each Guide section. The narrative format of the ERG is complemented and augmented by EISIL (Electronic Information System for International Law), a free online database that organizes and provides links to, and useful information on, web resources from the full spectrum of international law. EISIL‘s subject-organized format and expert-provided content also enhances its potential as teaching tool. Try the EISIL search engine below:

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Provides quick access to the primary legal materials, such as statutes, cases and provincial laws of Canada.
Directory & search engine of the world's embassies & consulates. Allows searching by 'host' or 'guest' country via engine or directory. .
Provides links to legal and government information available on the web for each of the world's nations

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Law Journals, Encyclopedias and Dictionaries

These links point to web pages maintained by U.S.-published law reviews and similar periodical publications, including publications (sometimes called "e-journals" that are published only on the Internet. Links to federal litigation guides, handbooks, and manuals are also provided.
The United States Department of Labor prepared this handbook. It deals with statutes and regulations that it administers, being designed primarily for small businesses.
Stanford, Cornell, and Findlaw are among the sponsors of this subject searchable University Law Review Project database. Journals are listed in broad categories and noted if full text or abstracts are available.

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A comprehensive listing by title of law journals available on the Web.
Nolo Press Law Centers put the law into plain English for the layperson. Do you need to know the meaning of sprinkling trust, toxic tort or some equally puzzling legal term? Look it up here. This glossary contains plain-English definitions for hundreds of legal terms, from the common to the bizarre.
Wex is an ambitious effort to construct a collaboratively-created, public-access law dictionary and encyclopedia. It is sponsored and hosted by the Legal Information Institute at the Cornell Law School. Much of the material that appears in Wex was originally developed for the LII's "Law about..." pages, to which Wex is the successor.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Legal Self-Help

A 15-page guide for non-lawyers.
From the American Bar Association.
A general-purpose information site for anyone with legal problems.
Legal encyclopedias are a great place to start any legal research. The Farmington Community Library owns American Jurisprudence, 2d series.

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Nolo Press Law Centers put the law into plain English for the layman. Go directly to the topic areas or browse the legal encyclopedia. Browse the "Ask Auntie Nolo" questions and answers in the archives or pose a question of your own
The Library of Michigan offers several helpful Guides, such "How to Find" Michigan statutes, federal statutes,etc.
This is the online procedural handbook of Michigan's Friend of the Court, covering support, custody and parenting time for Michigan children.
Michigan Legal Help is an interactive website built to help self-represented litigants handle relatively simple civil legal matters on their own.
An overview of legal research on the Internet is provided with links on how to find Michigan cases and statutes
Frequently asked questions are answered and a handbook outlines the divorce process. Some forms are also provided.
From divorce.net.
Legal research requires the use of special tools and publications. The Virtual Chase informs about Web sites and research strategies for finding the law.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Legal Forms

This site, from LLRX.com, includes links to over 1,400 sources for state and federal court rules, forms and dockets. You can browse to find the resource you need, or search by keyword.
Links to forms Web sites in the following categories: forms collections and indexes, forms dealing with particular issues, and government forms. Also has links to state tax forms.

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The Internet Legal Resource Guide is a categorized index of more than 4000 select web sites. This site was established to serve as a comprehensive resource of the information available on the Internet concerning law and the legal profession, with an emphasis on the United States. Designed for lay persons and legal scholars alike, it is quality controlled to include only the most substantive legal resources online. The selection criteria are predicated on two principles: the extent to which the resource is unique, as well as the relative value of the information it provides. The archive of more than 80 legal forms is keyword searchable.
The Legal Resource Center is a free service, provided by LawInfo.com, that is designed to help consumers and businesses resolve their legal issues. Samples of legal forms and documents, include a contract to sell your car, a will, or an employment agreement. Use the drop down menus for "court forms" and then choose a state. You may scroll through the selection or search. Forms are displayed through Acrobat Reader.
The 'Lectric Law Library's form page offers general and business forms (with another page dedicated to law practice forms). It claims to be the biggest collection of law related forms. If you read the page on relying on legal information at Can I Rely on the 'Lectric Law Library's Material? you will be, not only informed but, amused. A good place to start your search.
The State Court Administrative Office provides SCAO approved forms for court actions in State of Michigan (not federal) courts, indexed by topic area. These forms can be downloaded as PDF files using Adobe Acrobat.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Local Ordinances

Links to municipal codes online are arranged alphabetically by city/township.
General Code Publishers provides links to city and county codes online. Searchable. However, only one Michigan City Code is listed :Roseville.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Michigan Law

This site offers full text of Michigan Supreme Court opinions & orders since October 1995 and Michigan Court of Appeals published opinions since August 1996. It also offers the Michigan Court Rules and other links to key Michigan law sites.
The Michigan Rules of Court are the rules adopted by the Michigan Supreme Court to govern Michigan's legal system and the judges, lawyers, and other professionals who are charged with preserving the integrity of that system. The purpose of the Court Rules is to establish uniform rules and procedures for all levels of Michigan's court system. These regulations ensure that cases are resolved without undue delay and that those who appear in court receive due process and equal treatment under the law..
Under some circumstances, Attorney General Opinions can have the force and effect of a law. These opinions are searchable by keyword and subject.
MichiganLegalAid.org provides help with legal problems to low income residents of Michigan. On this site you will find information about the law and about places to go for help with legal and related problems.

In addition you will find a selection of self help materials including automated Michigan court forms which you can complete with step by step online assistance. You can find articles, documents and forms to help you with your problem, as well as find a lawyer, organization or related service to help you with your problem.
The Michigan Legislature Website is a free service of the Legislative Internet Technology Team in cooperation with the Michigan Legislative Council, the Michigan House of Representatives, and the Michigan Senate. You can search Michigan Compiled Laws, Public Acts and Pending Bills.

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The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Other States' Laws

Cornell Law School's Legal Information Institute links to state statutes, constitutions, judicial opinions, and regulations. Search by state and by topic across states.
Use FindLaw's State Resources list to link to web information on each state: laws, cases, government, court systems, law firms, etc
The Library of Congress has assembled this set of meta-indexes to State & Local Governments and organizations.
The Knowledge Management Office maintains a listing of court-related web sites. The sites are divided into three parts: State Court Web Sites, which includes local and municipal court web sites. Federal Court Web Sites which includes federal court-related web sites, and international Court Web Sites
Links to government-sponsored websites are organized state by state and lead to all branches and agencies of state government. Follow the state link to many counties and cities also.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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Our Subscription Databases

Fills a much-needed gap between legal texts focusing on the theory and history behind the law and more practical guides dealing with the law and its everyday effect upon its citizens. Articles include brief descriptions of each issue's historical background, profiles of various U.S. laws and regulations, details of how laws and regulations vary from state to state, and comprehensive bibliographies that include print and Web resources and lists of relevant organizations.



LegalTracLegalTrac

Provides full-text coverage of major law reviews, legal newspapers, bar association journals and international legal journals offers law students, faculty and legal researchers the publications they need for their research and practicum. Each title included is selected on the basis of criteria provided the American Association of Law Libraries.




Provides current information on more than 5,000 legal topics. Includes completely revised articles covering important issues, biographies, definitions of legal terms and more. Covers such high-profile topics as the Americans with Disabilities Act, capital punishment, domestic violence, gay and lesbian rights, and physician-assisted suicide.

The Farmington Community Library offers this legal resource information as a service to the community. This material should not be considered legal advice or a substitute for expert legal consultation as appropriate to the circumstances.

Try to keep in mind that learning about legal research and the law is an imposing task. It is no substitute for professional advice. Just as you would not consider taking out your own appendix, even though you may have read about how it is done, consider seeking the advice of a lawyer, or other appropriate counsel, before making any major legal decision.

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