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Books To Go! – Fiction

A selection of outstanding fiction titles, old and new, with brief but helpful annotations, sponsored by the Farmington Friends of the Library.

To browse through our Books To Go Non-Fiction titles click here!

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Affinity by Sarah Waters.

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Greeted with enthusiastic praise, Sarah Waters's debut novel, Tipping the Velvet, was lauded as "amazing" and "delightful" (Salon.com), "buoyant and accomplished" (The New York Times Book Review), "glorious" (The Boston Globe), and "wonderful" (San Francisco Chronicle). Read More..Read Less

All the Names by Jose Saramago.

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This tale is a Kafkaesque journey into one man's obsession amid the arid, repetitive, and cumbersome bureaucratic environment in which he works. Read More..Read Less

And the Mountains Echoed : A Novel by Khaled Hosseini.

book cover

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Presents a story inspired by human love, how people take care of one another, and how choices resonate through subsequent generations. Read More..Read Less

Angle of repose by Wallace Stegner.

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Stegner's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel is the story of four generations in the life of an American family. A wheelchair-bound retired historian embarks on a monumental quest: to come to know his grandparents, now long dead. Read More..Read Less

The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach.

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In this deft first novel, a baseball prodigy comes to Westish College, a small school in upper Wisconsin. Read More.. Read Less

The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein.

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Enzo narrates his life story, beginning with his impending death. Enzo's not afraid of dying, as he's seen a television documentary on the Mongolian belief that a good dog will reincarnate as a man. Read More.. Read Less

As Hot As It Was You Ought to Thank Me by Nanci Kincaid.

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Kincaid's fourth novel is a deliciously intimate portrayal of the sunstruck small town of Pinetta, Fla., as seen through the eyes of Berry, a 13-year-old trying to make sense of adult indiscretions and her own sexual awakening. Read More.. Read Less

Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Vol.1: The Pox Party by M.T. Anderson.

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In this fascinating and eye-opening Revolution-era novel, Octavian, a black youth raised in a Boston household of radical philosophers, is given an excellent classical education. Read More.. Read Less

Atonement by Ian McEwan.

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Set during the seemingly idyllic summer of 1935 at the country estate of the Tallis family, the first section of this thought-provoking novel ambles through one scorchingly hot day that changes the lives of almost everyone present. Read More.. Read Less

The Aviator's Wife by Melanie Benjamin.

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Despite her own major achievements--she becomes the first licensed female glider pilot in the United States--Anne Morrow Lindbergh is viewed merely as Charles Lindbergh's wife. Read More..Read Less

Baker Towers by Jennifer Haigh.

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Haigh's second novel, following the glowing Mrs. Kimble (2003), is set in Bakerton, a mining town in post-World World II Pennsylvania. Haigh's focus is the Novak family, particularly the five children being raised by their Italian mother after their Polish father drops dead. Read More.. Read Less

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Dai Sijie.

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Stories set in China during the Cultural Revolution usually follow a trail of human struggle and tragedy, but this little gem of a book spins magic thread out of broken dreams. Read More.. Read Less

Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter.

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In 1962, Pasquale Tursi, inheritor-proprietor of the Hotel Adequate View in Porto Vergogna, Italy, a tiny coastal village visited only by tourists who overshoot the similarly named neighbor they intended to go to, is shocked when beautiful, sickly American starlet Dee Moray arrives, on purpose. Read More.. Read Less

Beekeeper's Apprentice by Laurie R. King.

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The Beekeeper's Apprentice is a classic mystery novel and the first in a series featuring an unlikely pair of detectives. Read More.. Read Less

Before You Know Kindness by Chris Bohjalian.

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Bohjalian's novel is a focused look at how a family copes with a tragic accident and how their own deeply held beliefs and desires affect their relationships with each other. Read More.. Read Less

Bel Canto by Ann Patchett.

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Opera and terrorism make strange bedfellows, yet in this novel they complement each other nicely. At a birthday party for Japanese industrialist Mr. Hosokawa somewhere in South America, famous American soprano Roxanne Coss is just finishing her recital in the Vice President's home when armed terrorists appear, intending to take the President hostage. Read More.. Read Less

Belong to Me by Marisa de los Santos.

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Having met Cornelia Brown in de los Santos's well-reviewed debut,Love Walked In, we now follow her and her oncologist husband, Teo Sandoval, to suburban Philadelphia. Read More.. Read Less

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel by Deborah Maggach.

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Now a major motion picture starring Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson, Billy Nighy, and Dev Patel When Ravi Kapoor, an overworked London doctor, reaches the breaking point with his difficult father-in-law, he asks his wife: "Can't we just send him away somewhere? Somewhere far, far away." Read More.. Read Less

Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain.

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Written in a voice that is at once hopeful, cautious, naive, profoundly wise, and completely lost yet utterly knowing, Fountain's most recent work of fiction delivers a brilliant, powerful examination of how modern warfare affects soldiers back at home. Read More..Read Less

The Binding Chair: Or, A Visit from the Foot Emancipation Society by Kathryn Harrison.

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In poised and elegant prose, Kathryn Harrison weaves a stunning story of women, travel, and flights of love, revenge, and fear; of the search for home and the need to escape it. Read More.. Read Less

The Birth House by Ami McKay.

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When Dr. Gilbert Thomas, self-proclaimed expert in hygienic, pain-free childbirth, opens a practice in a Nova Scotia coastal village during the World War I years, it sets the stage for a classic conflict between long-held traditions and modern medicine. Read More.. Read Less

The Bohemians by Ben Tarnoff.

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Tarnoff's (A Counterfeiter's Paradise) glimmering prose lends grandeur to this account of four writers (Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Charles Warren Stoddard, and Ina Coolbrith) who built "an extraordinary literary scene" in the frontier boom town of 1860s San Francisco. Read More..Read Less

Breakfast with Buddha by Roland Merullo.

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Veteran novelist Merullo continues the spiritual odyssey he began in Golfing with God (2005). Otto Ringling, a successful New York editor and contented family man, has been in a slump ever since his parents were killed in an automobile accident. To settle the estate, he and his loopy sister, Cecilia, must drive to the family homestead in North Dakota. Read More..Read Less

The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder.

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The Bridge of San Luis Rey opens in the aftermath of an inexplicable tragedy--a tiny footbridge in Peru breaks, and five people hurtle to their deaths. Read More.. Read Less

Brooklyn: a Novel by Colm Tóibín.

Brooklyn Book Cover

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In Ireland in the early 1950s, Eilis Lacey is one of many who cannot find work at home. Thus when a job is offered in America, it is clear to everyone that she must go. Read More.. Read Less


Charming Billy by Alice McDermott.

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Though this novel opens just after his pathetic, drunken death, the eponymous Billy is the center of McDermott's tale of love and redemption among a complex group of Irish American Catholics in modern New York. Read More.. Read Less

Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith.

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In the workers' paradise of Stalin's Russia, crime cannot exist. Loyal, hardworking citizens will have all their needs met by the state, making crime unnecessary. Read More.. Read Less

The City & the City by China Mieville.

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Better known for New Weird fantasies (Perdido Street Station, etc.), bestseller Mieville offers an outstanding take on police procedurals with this barely speculative novel. Read More.. Read Less

City of Refuge by Tom Piazza.

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In the heat of late summer, two New Orleans families-one black and one white-confront a storm that will change the course of their lives. Read More.. Read Less

Claire of the Sea Light by Edwidge Danticat

Claire of the Sea Light

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As a native Haitian, Danticat (Brother, I'm Dying) is known for taking an innate cultural understanding and mixing it with a spare, striking writing style, always with marvelous results. Read More.. Read Less

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole.

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Meet Ignatius J. Reilly, the hero of John Kennedy Toole's tragicomic tale, A Confederacy of Dunces. This 30-year-old medievalist lives at home with his mother in New Orleans, pens his magnum opus on Big Chief writing pads he keeps hidden under his bed, and relays to anyone who will listen the traumatic experience he once had on a Greyhound Scenicruiser bound for Baton Rouge. Read More.. Read Less

A Conspiracy of Paper by David Liss.

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Set in a vividly realized eighteenth-century London, detective Benjamin Weaver, a Jew, former prizefighter, and a bit of a wise guy, an inspired creation, is such an outsider he can credibly go anywhere, from a seamy tavern to raucous Exchange Alley, the Wall Street of its day, to the snuff-and-wig set of a gentleman's club. Read More.. Read Less

The Cookbook Collector: A Novel by Allegra Goodman.

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Emily is the classy and astute CEO of a San Francisco digital start-up about to go public in late 1999. Her lover, Jonathan, is launching his own tech company in Cambridge, and questions of trust and ambition are complicating marriage plans. Read More.. Read Less

Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner.

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It's deceptively simple: two bright young couples meet during the Depression and form an instant and lifelong friendship. Read More.. Read Less

Crow Lake by Mary Lawson.

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Here is a gorgeous, slow-burning story set in the rural "badlands" of northern Ontario, where heartbreak and hardship are mirrored in the landscape. Read More.. Read Less

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon.

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The hero of Haddon's debut novel is 15-year-old Christopher Boone, an autistic math genius who has just discovered the dead body of his neighbor's poodle, Wellington. Read More.. Read Less

Cutting for Stone by A. Verghese.

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Lauded for his sensitive memoir (My Own Country) about his time as a doctor in eastern Tennessee at the onset of the AIDS epidemic in the '80s, Verghese turns his formidable talents to fiction, mining his own life and experiences in a magnificent, sweeping novel that moves from India to Ethiopia to an inner-city hospital in New York City over decades and generations. Read More.. Read Less

Dancing for Degas by Kathryn Wagner.

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Paris' Opera Ballet promises a new life for young Alexandrie, who welcomes the discipline of dance to escape rural poverty. Read More.. Read Less

Dante Club by Matthew Pearl.

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In 1865 Boston, not many people spoke Italian. It was much more popular for people to study Latin and Greek; the classic works in these languages were common reading for students and academics. But the small circle of literati in Pearl's inventive novel is bent on translating and publishing Dante's Divine Comedy so that all Americans may learn of the writer's genius. Read More.. Read Less

The Dive from Clausen's Pier by Ann Packer.

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Packer's first novel is a sensitive exploration of the line between selfishness and self-preservation. Read More.. Read Less

The Drowning Tree by Carol Goodman.

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Goodman's third novel mixes the same elements that made her The Lake of Dead Languages and The Seduction of Water successful: academia, water, and suspense. Juno McKay is a glass artist, caught up with running a business and raising a teenaged daughter. Read More.. Read Less

Eat Cake by Jeanne Ray.

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Ruth, with a teenage daughter, a son in college, and her mother living with the family, finds her life complicated by her husband's sudden unemployment and news that her long-divorced father has been injured and needs a place to recover. Read More.. Read Less

Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.

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Ella Minnow Pea is a girl living happily on the fictional island of Nollop off the coast of South Carolina. Read More.. Read Less

Empire Falls by Richard Russo.

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In a warmhearted novel of sweeping scope, Russo animates the dead-end small town of Empire Falls, Maine, long abandoned by the logging and textile industries that provided its citizens with their livelihood. Read More.. Read Less

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.

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Oskar Schell is not your average nine-year-old. A budding inventor, he spends his time imagining wonderful creations. He also collects random photographs for his scrapbook and sends letters to scientists. Read More.. Read Less

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.

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Internationally acclaimed with more than 5 million copies in print, Fahrenheit 451 is Ray Bradbury's classic novel of censorship and defiance, as resonant today as it was when it was first published. Guy Montag was a fireman whose job it was to start fires. Read More..Read Less

The False Friend by Myla Goldberg.

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The term mean girls is elevated to a new level in Goldberg's moody novel. Is there anything uglier or more damaging than the well-honed bullying techniques of middle-school girls? Read More.. Read Less

The Flight of Gemma Hardy by Margot Livesey.

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The talented Livesey updates Jane Eyre, changing the setting to Scotland and the Orkneys during the 1950s and '60s but taking care to home in on the elements of this classic story that so resonate with readers: a resourceful orphan makes her way in an uncaring world and not only endures but also triumphs. Read More.. Read Less

The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton.

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In 1913, a little girl arrives in Brisbane, Australia, and is taken in by a dockmaster and his wife. She doesn't know her name, and the only clue to her identity is a book of fairy tales tucked inside a white suitcase. Read More.. Read Less

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

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The world's most famous monster comes to life in this 1818 novel, a tale that combines Gothic romance and science fiction to tell of a young doctor's attempts to breathe life into an artificial man. Read More.. Read Less


Geek Love by Katherine Dunn.

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This audacious, mesmerizing novel should carry a warning: ``Reader Beware.'' Those entering the world of carnival freaks described by narrator Olympia Binewski, a bald, humpbacked albino dwarf, will find no escape from a story at once engrossing and repellent, funny and terrifying, unreal and true to human nature. Read More.. Read Less

The Giant's House by Elizabeth McCracken.

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The year is 1950, and in a small town on Cape Cod twenty-six-year-old librarian Peggy Cort feels like love and life have stood her up. Read More.. Read Less

The Girl in the Polka-dot Dress by Beryl Bainbridge.

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In this posthumous novel, British author Bainbridge paints a hypothetical picture of what might have been happening in 1968 America amid the turmoil of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy. Read More.. Read Less

Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier.

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A fictional account of how the Dutch artist Vermeer painted his masterpiece. In this splendid novel, the girl in the painting is Griet, the 16-year-old servant of the Vermeer household. Read More.. Read Less

The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kiernan.

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Kiernan (Signing Their Lives Away) writes compellingly of the women who toiled in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project to build the atomic bomb. Read More..Read Less

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

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There's the evil you can see coming-and then there's Amy Elliott. Superficially, this privileged Gotham golden girl, inspiration for her psychologist-parents' bestselling series of children's books, couldn't be further from the disturbingly damaged women of Edgar-finalist Flynn's first two books, Sharp Objects and Dark Places. Read More.. Read Less

Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee

Go Set A Watchman

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From Harper Lee comes a landmark new novel set two decades after her beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, To Kill a Mockingbird. Read More.. Read Less

Grand River and Joy by Susan Messer.

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Halloween morning 1966, Harry Levine arrives at his wholesale shoe warehouse to find an ethnic slur soaped on the front window.Read More.. Read Less

Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer.

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The letters comprising this small charming novel begin in 1946, when single, 30-something author Juliet Ashton (nom de plume "Izzy Bickerstaff") writes to her publisher to say she is tired of covering the sunny side of war and its aftermath. Read More.. Read Less

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

the handmaids tale by Margaret Atwood

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One of Canada's outstanding authors (an old poem of hers reads, ``You fit into me/ like a hook into an eye/ a fish hook/ an open eye'') has written a novel to rival Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-four. Read More.. Read Less

The Hearts of Horses by Molly Gloss.

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Martha Lessen is a young woman on the run, taking with her the three horses she loves. Read More.. Read Less

The Heretic's Daughter by Kathleen Kent.

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A family's conflict becomes a battle for life and death in this gripping and original first novel based on family history from a descendant of a condemned Salem witch.Read More.. Read Less

History of a Pleasure Seeker by Richard Mason.

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In fictionalized early twentieth-century Amsterdam, Piet Barol, son of a middle-class paper-pusher, secures a job with the plush Vermeulen-Sickerts family as private tutor to a brilliant but cripplingly obsessive young boy. Read More.. Read Less

A Hologram for the King by Dave Eggers.

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*Starred Review* Alan Clay is in Saudi Arabia, hired by an American company to sell an IT system based on a revolutionary hologram that enables far-flung associates to instantly commune with the telepresence of their colleagues, to the nascent (in fact, barely begun) King Abdullah Economic City. Read More.. Read Less

Homer and Langley: A Novel by E. L. Doctorow.

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Doctorow, whose literary trophy shelf has got to be overflowing by now, delivers a small but sweeping masterpiece about the infamous New York hermits, the Collyer brothers. Read More.. Read Less

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet: by Jamie Ford.

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Ford vacillates between a front story dominated by nostalgia and a backstory dominated by fear. The front story struggles to support the weight of the backstory, and the complexity Ford brings to the latter is the strength of this debut novel, which considers a Chinese American man's relationship with a Japanese American woman in the 1940s and his son in the 1980s.Read More.. Read Less

The Housekeeper and the Professor: by Yoko Ogawa.

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Ogawa (The Diving Pool) weaves a poignant tale of beauty, heart and sorrow in her exquisite new novel. Narrated by the Housekeeper, the characters are known only as the Professor and Root, the Housekeepers 10-year-old son, nicknamed by the Professor because the shape of his hair and head remind the Professor of the square root symbol.Read More.. Read Less

The How Do I Love Thee?: by Nancy Moser.

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The year is 1845. Elizabeth Barrett is a published poet-and a virtual prisoner in her own home. Blind family loyalty ties her to a tyrannical father who forbids any of his children to marry. Read More.. Read Less

I Capture the Castle: by Dodie Smith.

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A reprint of a 1948 novel on an eccentric and impoverished English family whose home is a ruined 14th century castle. Read More.. Read Less

The Ice Queen by Alice Hoffman.

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Be careful what you wish for. A woman who was touched by tragedy as a child now lives a quiet life, keeping other people at a cool distance. Read More.. Read Less

Icebergs by Rebecca Johns.

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In this work, whose title is a metaphor for the sinking effect war has on everyday life, we read about lives being changed by calamitous events and wrong choices. Read More.. Read Less

Impatient with Desire by Gabrielle Burton.

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Gabrielle Burton's Impatient with Desire is a beautifully written fictional account of the Donner party's epic journey of 1846. Read More.. Read Less

The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman.

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At the Caffe Greco in Rome, circa 1953, Atlanta financier Cyrus Ott makes an offer that can't be refused. He will establish an international English-language newspaper to be run in Italy by Betty, the woman he once loved, and her husband, Leo, a hack writer for a Chicago daily. Read More.. Read Less

In One Person by John Irving.

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Much of Irving's thirteenth novel is piquantly charming, crisply funny, and let-your-guard-down madcap in the classic mode of a Frank Capra or Billy Wilder film. Read More.. Read Less

The Inn at Lake Devine by Elinore Lipman.

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It was not complicated, and, as my mother pointed out, not even personal: They had a hotel; they didn't want Jews; we were Jews...It's the early 1960s and Natalie Marx is stunned when her mother inquires about vacation accommodations in Vermont and receives a response that says, "The Inn at Lake Devine is a family-owned resort, which has been in continuous operation since 1922.Read More.. Read Less

The Inner Circle by Brad Meltzer.

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Meltzer's (The Book of Lies; The Book of Fate) latest thriller takes the reader on an intriguing tour inside the National Archives. In order to impress a visiting friend from his high school days, archivist Beecher White decides to show her the secret vault where the President reviews classified documents. Read More..Read Less

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

The Invention of Wings Book Cover

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The story follows Hetty "Handful" Grimke, a Charleston slave, and Sarah, the daughter of the wealthy Grimke family. Read More..Read Less


The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom.

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Grissom's unsentimental debut twists the conventions of the antebellum novel just enough to give readers an involving new perspective on what would otherwise be fairly stock material. Read More.. Read Less

The Lady and the Poet by Maeve Haran.

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The unlikely yet enduring love between Jacobean poet John Donne and Ann More inspires British writer Haran (Having It All) for her first historical novel. Read More.. Read Less

The Lake of Darkness by Ruth Rendell.

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Martin is a quiet bachelor with a comfortable life, free of worry and distractions. When he unexpectedly comes into a small fortune, he decides to use his newfound wealth to help out those in need. Read More.. Read Less

The Last Frontier by Howard Fast.

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The Last Frontier was Howard Fast's first bestseller, and rightfully belongs on any short-list of best books. Read More.. Read Less

The Leftovers by Tom Perotta.

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October 14 looked like any other day in the leafy New England enclave of Mapleton-until it didn't. Eighty-seven townspeople and millions more around the world simply disappeared. Read More.. Read Less

The Leisure Seeker by Michael Zadorrian.

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Ella and John Robina, eightysomethings, take off in their Leisure Seeker RV against the will of their son, daughter, and doctors. Read More.. Read Less

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson.

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In a radical departure from her Jackson Brodie mystery series, Atkinson delivers a wildly inventive novel about Ursula Todd, born in 1910 and doomed to die and be reborn over and over again. She drowns, falls off a roof, and is beaten to death by an abusive husband but is always reborn back into the same loving family, sometimes with the knowledge that allows her to escape past poor decisions, sometimes not. Read More..Read Less

Life of Pi by Yann Martel.

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Pi Patel, a young man from India, tells how he was shipwrecked and stranded in a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger for 227 days. Read More.. Read Less

The Lifeboat by Charlotte Rogan.

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A young woman's first-person story of survival against seemingly insurmountable odds reveals truths about human nature and, particularly, about herself. Read More.. Read Less

The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman.

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*Starred Review* Stedman's haunting tale opens in 1918 with the return of Tom Sherbourne to his home in Australia after serving four years in the Great War. Read More.. Read Less

Little Bee by Chris Cleave.

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Little Bee, smart and stoic, knows two people in England, Andrew and Sarah, journalists she chanced upon on a Nigerian beach after fleeing a massacre in her village, one grisly outbreak in an off-the-radar oil war. Read More.. Read Less

The Lost and Forgotten Language of Shanghai by Ruiyan Xu.

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A massive explosion in a Shanghai hotel leaves 32-year-old businessman Li Jing unable to utter a single word in Chinese. Read More.. Read Less

Lost Horizon by James Hilton.

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A strangely absorbing and fascinating story of a lost Englishman, Hugh Conway, of the Consular Service in India. Read More.. Read Less

The Lost Mother by Mary McGarry Morris.

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"They said it was bad for everyone, but nobody else the boy knew had to live in the woods." Thus begins the harrowing story of 12-year-old Thomas and eight-year-old Margaret in Morris's powerful sixth novel. Read More.. Read Less

The Lottery by Patricia Wood.

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By choosing to tell the story of Perry L. Crandall, a 31-year-old man with an IQ of 76, from Perry's viewpoint and in his own voice, debut author Wood has set herself quite a challenge. Read More.. Read Less

Love by Toni Morrison.

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The first page of Toni Morrison's novel Love is a soft introduction to a narrator who pulls you in with her version of a tale of the ocean-side community of Up Beach, a once popular ocean resort. Read More.. Read Less

Loving Frank by Nancy Horan.

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In 1904, architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed a house for Edwin and Mamah Borthwick Cheney, respectable members of Oak Park, IL, society. Read More.. Read Less

The Lucky Gourd Shop by Joanna Catherine Scott.

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When the adoptive mother of three Korean children writes away to discover their past, she has no way of knowing that the real truth of how they became orphans is too complex and too full of hardship to ever come to light. Read More.. Read Less

The Madonnas of Leningrad by Debra Dean.

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Her granddaughter's wedding should be a time of happiness for Marina Buriakov. But the Russian emigre's descent into Alzheimer's has her and her family experiencing more anxiety than joy. Read More.. Read Less

The Magicians by Lev Grossman.

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This literary fantasy, drawing heavily from the fantasy canon but unique in its reworking of it, can be seen as a sort of darker, modern-day response to the magic-in-the-real-world of Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell (2004).Read More.. Read Less

Major Pettigrew's Last Stand: A Novel by Helen Simonson.

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Change is threatening the little world of Edgecombe St. Mary. Lord Dagenham is about to sell off part of his ancestral estate to developers, and Pakistanis have taken over the village shop. Read More.. Read Less

The Mark of the Angel by Nancy Huston.

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The Mark of the Angel, tells the story of Saffie, a young German girl who takes a job as a housekeeper in 1957 Paris. Read More.. Read Less

The Martian by Andy Weir.

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A dust storm strands astronaut Mark Watney on Mars and forces his landing crew to abandon the mission and return to Earth in Weir's excellent first novel, a SF thriller. Watney, injured by flying debris and presumed dead, is alone on Mars with no communication and limited supplies. He is, however, the mission engineer, the fix-it guy, and with intelligence and grit he goes to work to stay alive. Read More..Read Less

The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury.

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The Martian Chronicles, widely considered to be sf legend Bradbury's masterpiece, is less science fiction than social commentary on the America of the years immediately following World War II. Read More.. Read Less

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes.

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A New York Times bestseller-with more than one million copies sold-by the author of The Girl You Left Behind. They had nothing in common until love gave them everything to lose . . . Read More.. Read Less

Middle Age: A Romance by Joyce Carol Oates.

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Oates returns to some familiar themes—death, identity, deception—in this story set in the financially affluent, yet emotionally bankrupt town of Salthill-on-Hudson, a fictional Manhattan suburb. Read More.. Read Less

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides.

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In his second novel, the author of The Virgin Suicides (1993) once again proves himself to be a wildly imaginative writer, this time penning a coming-of-age tale, ranging from the 1920s in Asia Minor to the present in Berlin, about a hermaphrodite. Read More.. Read Less

Mistress of the Art of Death by Araina Franklin.

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It is 1171 in Cambridge, England, and Henry II is beside himself. Four children have been found murdered and mutilated, and the townsfolk of Cambridge are blaming the Jews, who have taken shelter in the castle. Read More.. Read Less

Moghul Buffet by Cheryl Benard.

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Both a wickedly funny cross-cultural comedy of errors and an edgy murder mystery, Benard's lively debut begins with the disappearance of timid, pudgy U.S. businessman Micky Malone in Peshawar, an ultraconservative, crime-ridden Pakistani backwater on the Afghan border. Read More.. Read Less

Mourning Ruby by Helen Dunmore.

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When Rebecca, the narrator of most of Dunmore's fine, almost unbearably sad eighth novel shares a flat with Joe in London, she begins to enjoy the pleasures of friendship and family for the first time in her life: she was abandoned as a baby and adopted by a couple remarkably unsuitable for parenting. Read More.. Read Less

Mr. Emerson's Wife by Amy Belding Brown.

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The line between historical and fictional is murky in this nineteenth-century tale of love among the Transcendentalists. Read More.. Read Less

Mudbound by Hillary Jordan.

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*Starred Review* When I think of the farm, I think of mud, says Laura, the main character in this sophisticated, complex first novel. Read More.. Read Less

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie.

Murder on the Orient Express Book Cover

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Just after midnight, a snowstorm stops the Orient Express dead in its tracks in the middle of Yugoslavia. The luxurious train is surprisingly full for this time of year. But by morning there is one passenger less. Read More.. Read Less

The Museum of Extra Ordinary Things by Alice Hoffman.

The Museum of Extraordinary Things

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Coralie Sardie is the daughter of the sinister impresario behind The Museum of Extraordinary Things, a Coney Island freak show that thrills the masses.Read More.. Read Less

My Antonia by Willa Cather.

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No romantic novel ever written in America . . . is one half as beautiful as "My Antonia," H. L. Mencken. Widely recognized as Willa Cather's greatest novel, My Antonia is a soulful and rich portrait of a pioneer woman's simple yet heroic life. Read More.. Read Less

My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult.

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Imagine that you were conceived to be the donor of bone marrow and platelets for your older sister, who has a rare form of cancer. Read More.. Read Less

The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri.

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The Namesake follows the Ganguli family through its journey from Calcutta to Cambridge to the Boston suburbs. Read More.. Read Less

 

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro.

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Kathy, Tommy, and Ruth were once classmates at Hailsham, a private school in the English countryside with a most unusual student body: human clones created solely to serve as organ donors.Read More.. Read Less

The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith.

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This first novel in Alexander McCall Smith's widely acclaimed The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series tells the story of the delightfully cunning and enormously engaging Precious Ramotswe, who is drawn to her profession to "help people with problems in their lives."Read More.. Read Less

Old School by Tobias Wolff.

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The protagonist of Tobias Wolff's shrewdly—and at times devastatingly—observed first novel is a boy at an elite prep school in 1960. Read More.. Read Less


The Obituary Writer by Ann Hood.

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Best-selling novelist Hood (The Red Thread, 2010) has fashioned a diptych of two seemingly unconnected women. Claire, an unhappy suburban housewife and mother inspired by John F. Kennedy's 1960 presidential campaign and Jackie's glamour, has a brief, ultimately tragic affair. Read More..Read Less

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.

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BIn Gaiman's first novel for adults since Anansi Boys (2005), the never-named fiftyish narrator is back in his childhood homeland, rural Sussex, England, where he's just delivered the eulogy at a funeral. With an hour or so to kill afterward, he drives about aimlessly, he thinks until he's at the crucible of his consciousness: a farmhouse with a duck pond. Read More..Read Less

Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout.

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Starred Review* Hell. We're always alone. Born alone. Die alone, says Olive Kitteridge, redoubtable seventh-grade math teacher in Crosby, Maine.Read More.. Read Less

Once Upon a River by Bonnie Jo Campbell.

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*Starred Review* Margo Crane, 16, is called Sprite, River Nymph, a throwback, and a river princess. Beautiful, strong, and quiet, she is a hunter and a sharpshooter.Read More.. Read Less

Once We Were Brothers by Ronald H. Balson.

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This self-published debut novel, with more than 100,000 copies sold, has now been picked up by a major publisher, and it's not hard to see why. The story follows two boys, Jewish Ben Solomon and German Otto Piatek, who were raised together in the small Polish town of Zamosc during the 1930s. Read More..Read Less

One Amazing Thing by Chitra Divakaruni.

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After the glorious complexity of The Palace of Illusions (2008), Divakaruni, who also writes for young readers, presents a wise and beautifully refined drama. Read More.. Read Less

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

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Tells the story of the Buendia family, set against the background of the evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town.

One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus.

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An American western with a most unusual twist, Read More.. Read Less

Orphan Train by Christina Kline.

Orphan Train Book Cover

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Penobscot Indian Molly Ayer is close to 'aging out' out of the foster care system. A community service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping Molly out of juvie and worse. Read More.. Read Less

Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson.

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Three years after his wife's accidental death, Trond Sander, 67, settles into an isolated cabin near Norway's southeastern border with Sweden.Read More.. Read Less

The Outside Boy : A Novel by Jeanine Cummins.

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Christy, nearly 12, is an Irish Traveller, a Pavee, a child of motion who, with his family, journeys restlessly from town to town, never staying in any place long enough to call it home. Read More.. Read Less

Peace Like a River by Leif Enger.

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To the list of great American child narrators that includes Huck Finn and Scout Finch, let us now add Reuben "Rube" Land, the asthmatic 11-year-old boy at the center of Leif Enger's remarkable first novel, Peace Like a River.Read More.. Read Less

 

People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks.

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With an ingenuity equal to that standing behind her Pultizer Prize-winning March (2005), which was a fictional imagining of the life of the father character in Louisa May Alcott's classic novel Little Women, Brooks now fictionalizes the history of an actual book, Read More.. Read Less

The Persia Café by Melany Neilson.

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The subject matter of this debut novel is reminiscent of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird or Ernest Gaines's A Lesson Before Dying.Read More.. Read Less

Plain Truth by Jodi Picoult.

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Moving seamlessly from psychological drama to courtroom suspense,Plain Truth is a fascinating portrait of Amish life rarely witnessed by those outside the faith. Read More.. Read Less

 

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver.

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The first novel in five years from the ever-popular Kingsolver (Pigs in Heaven, 1993, etc.) is a large-scale saga of an American family's enlightening and disillusioning African adventure. Read More.. Read Less

The Postmistress by Sarah Blake.

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To open Blake's novel of World War II and the convergence of three strong women is to enter a slipstream, so powerful are its velocity, characters, and drama. Read More.. Read Less

Prayers for Sale by Sandra Dallas.

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The idea of selling prayers conjures images of pre-Reformation Catholicism or, at the very least, stops you in your tracks to think a bit. Read More..

Presumed Innocent by Scott Turow.

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Chicago defense attorney Turow, formerly a U.S. prosecutor, capitalizes on his intimate knowledge of the courtroom in an impressive first novel that matches Anatomy of a Murder in its intensity and verisimilitude. Read More.. Read Less

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

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No novel in English has given more pleasure than Pride and Prejudice . Because it is one of the great works in our literature, critics in every generation reexamine and reinterpret it. Read More.. Read Less

Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier.

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The novel begins in Monte Carlo, where our heroine is swept off her feet by the dashing widower Maxim de Winter and his sudden proposal of marriage. Read More.. Read Less

The River Midnight by Lillian Nattel.

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Like the mythical Polish shtetl of Blaszka in which it is set, The River Midnight is boisterous, tangled with secrets, and startlingly generous.Read More.. Read Less

Room: A Novel by Emma Donoghue.

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Five-year-old Jack and his Ma enjoy their long days together, playing games, watching TV, and reading favorite stories. Through Jack's narration, it slowly becomes apparent that their pleasant days are shrouded by a horrifying secret. Read More.. Read Less

The Round House by Louise Erdrich.

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In her intensely involving fourteenth novel, Erdrich writes with brio in the voice of a man reliving the fateful summer of his thirteenth year. The son of a tribal judge, Bazil, and a tribal enrollment specialist, Geraldine, Joe Coutts is an attentively loved and lucky boy until his mother is brutally beaten and raped. Read More..Read Less

Run by Ann Patchett

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Run by Ann Patchett

"*Starred Review* The question of what makes a family is central to this luminous novel, Patchett's first since her award-winning Bel Canto (2001). Read More.. Read Less


Safe from the Sea by Peter Geye.

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This finely crafted first novel takes place in the wooded areas around a small lake north of Duluth and in the tempestuous waters of Lake Superior. Read More.. Read Less

Samurai's Garden by Gail Tsukiyama

Samurai's Garden Book Cover

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The daughter of a Chinese mother and a Japanese father, Tsukiyama uses the Japanese invasion of China during the late 1930s as a somber backdrop for her unusual story about a 20-year-old Chinese painter named Stephen who is sent to his family's summer home in a Japanese coastal village to recover from a bout with tuberculosis. Read More.. Read Less

Sandcastle Girls by Chris Bohjalian.

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Between April 1915 and April 1916, one and one-half million Armenians were killed by the Ottoman Empire during WWI. Read More.. Read Less

Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay.

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In the summer of 1942, the French police arrested thousands of Jewish families and held them outside of Paris before shipping them off to Auschwitz.Read More.. Read Less

The Saturday Wife by Naomi Ragen.

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Delilah Goldgrab just wanted to be part of the in-crowd. Being blond, attractive, and saddled with the name of a biblical temptress did not make things easy at her Orthodox Jewish girls school.Read More.. Read Less

The Secret River by Kate Grenville.

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Grenville, author of the Orange Award winner The Idea of Perfection (2002), tells a story rooted in her family's Australian past. Read More.. Read Less

The Shanghai Girls by Lisa See

Shanghai Girls Book Cover

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In 1937 Shanghai—the Paris of Asia—twenty-one-year-old Pearl Chin and her younger sister, May, are having the time of their lives.Read More.. Read Less

Slade House by David Mitchell

Slade House Book Cover

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Down the road from a working-class British pub, along the brick wall of a narrow alley, you just might find the entrance to Slade House.Read More.. Read Less

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See.

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See's engrossing novel set in remote 19th-century China details the deeply affecting story of lifelong, intimate friends (laotong, or "old sames") Lily and Snow Flower, their imprisonment by rigid codes of conduct for women and their betrayal by pride and love.Read More.. Read Less

The Space Between Us by Thrity Umrigar.

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Sera Dubash is an upper-middle-class Parsi housewife in modern-day Bombay. Bhima is her domestic servant. Though they inhabit dramatically different worlds, the two women have much in common. Read More.. Read Less

State of Wonder by Ann Patchett.

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Marina Singh gave up a career as a doctor after botching an emergency delivery as an intern, opting instead for the more orderly world of research for a pharmaceutical company. Read More.. Read Less

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel.

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Onstage at a Toronto theater, an aging movie star drops dead while performing the title role in King Lear. As the other cast members share a drink at the lobby bar before heading into the snowy night, none can know what horrors await them: "Of all of them at the bar that night, the bartender was the one who survived the longest. He died three weeks later on the road out of the city." The Shakespearean tragedy unfolds into a real-life calamity just before the entire world is overtaken by a catastrophic flu pandemic that will kill off the vast majority of the population. Read More..Read Less

Still Alice by Lisa Genova.

Still Alice Book Cover

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Alice Howland -- Harvard professor, gifted researcher, and lecturer, wife, and mother of three grown children -- sets out for a run and soon realizes she has no idea how to find her way home. Read More..Read Less

Still Life by Louise Penny.

Still Life Book Cover

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Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Sûreté du Québec and his team of investigators are called in to the scene of a suspicious death in a rural village south of Montreal.Read More..Read Less

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.

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A Tale of Two Cities is Charles Dickens's great historical novel, set against the violent upheaval of the French Revolution. The most famous and perhaps the most popular of his works, it compresses an event of immense complexity to the scale of a family history, with a cast of characters that includes a bloodthirsty ogress and an antihero as believably flawed as any in modern fiction. Read More..Read Less

Tamar by Mal Peet.

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It was her taciturn but beloved grandfather, William Hyde, who gave Tamar her strange name. But in 1995, when she was 15, he committed suicide, leaving her to wonder if she knew him at all. Read More.. Read Less

The Tenderness of Wolves by Stef Penney.

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The frigid isolation of European immigrants living on the 19th-century Canadian frontier is the setting for British author Penney's haunting debut. Seventeen-year-old Francis Ross disappears the same day his mother discovers the scalped body of his friend, fur trader Laurent Jammet, in a neighboring cabin. Read More.. Read Less

Then We Came to the End by Joshua Ferris.

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Starred Review* Anyone who has ever logged time in a gray cubicle with cloth walls that wouldn't hold tacks will be astounded at the accuracy of this first-novel portrait of the workplace demimonde. Read More.. Read Less

Three Junes by Julia Glass.

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This strong and memorable debut novel draws the reader deeply into the lives of several central characters during three separate Junes spanning ten years. Read More.. Read Less

The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger.

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On the surface, Henry and Clare Detamble are a normal couple living in Chicago's Lincoln Park neighborhood. Henry works at the Newberry Library and Clare creates abstract paper art, but the cruel reality is that Henry is a prisoner of time. Read More.. Read Less

Tinkers by Paul Harding.

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*Starred Review* A tinker is a mender, and in Harding's spellbinding debut, he imagines the old, mendable horse-and-carriage world. The objects of the past were more readily repaired than our electronics, but the living world was a mystery, as it still is, as it always will be.Read More.. Read Less

The Tortilla Curtain by T. Coraghessan Boyle.

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Boyle avoids any potential pitfall of his prior achievement by veering in another direction and seriously examining social and political issues in this timely novel. Read More.. Read Less

Travels with My Aunt by Graham Greene.

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Greene's fine sense of humor is displayed in this warm and far-reaching comic novel, Travels with My Aunt, a bestseller when it appeared originally. Read More.. Read Less

Triangle by Katherine Weber.

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Although the first pages of this novel might lead readers to believe they're embarking on a piece of historical fiction about the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, it soon becomes clear that Weber has something else in mind. Read More.. Read Less

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis.

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This was not the life smart and lovely Hattie expected to live after fleeing Jim Crow Georgia in 1923 and settling in Philadelphia. Two years later, married (at 16) to an irresponsible man, she is poor, cold, hungry, and desperate as her twin babies sicken with pneumonia. Read More.. Read Less

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce

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The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce

*Starred Review* Spontaneity has never been Harold Fry's strong suit, especially once he retired. Just ask his long-suffering wife, Maureen.Read More.. Read Less

The Virgin Blue by Tracy Chevalier.

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Meet Ella Turner and Isabelle du Moulin—two women born centuries apart, yet bound by a fateful family legacy.Read More.. Read Less

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides.

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The Lisbon girls, all five of whom committed suicide in the early 1970s, haunt the memories of boys next door in a wealthy Detroit suburb.Read More.. Read Less

We have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson.

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Since the mysterious death of four family members, the superstitious Mary Katherine "Merricat" Blackwood, her ailing uncle Julian, and agoraphobic sister Constance have lived in a bizarre but contented state of isolation. Read More..Read Less

The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown.

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You don't have to have a sister or be a fan of the Bard to love Brown's bright, literate debut, but it wouldn't hurt.Read More.. Read Less

When the Ground Turns in Its Sleep by Sylvia Sellers-Garcia.

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In her debut novel, Sellers-Garcia draws from her own experience as a transnational whose cultural identity springs from both the United States and Central America. Read More.. Read Less

When We Were Orphans by Kazuo Ishiguro.

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Born in early-twentieth-century Shanghai, Banks was orphaned at the age of nine after the separate disappearances of his parents.Read More.. Read Less

Whistling Season by Ivan Doig.

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Doig's latest foray through Montana history begins in the late 1950s, with Superintendent of Public Instruction Paul Milliron on the verge of announcing the closure of the state's one-room schools, seen as hopelessly out of date in the age of Sputnik. Read More.. Read Less

White Ghost Girls by Alice Greenway.

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American teenagers Frankie and Kate are living in Hong Kong with their mother and nanny. It is 1967, and their photographer father is on assignment in Vietnam.Read More.. Read Less

The Widower's Tale by Julia Glass.

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Glass' fourth novel is a capacious family drama with as many brimming rooms and secret nooks and crannies as the historic Massachusetts home of Percy Darling, an acerbic patriarch, penitential widower, and former librarian at Harvard's Widener Library.Read More.. Read Less

The World We Found by Thrity Umrigar.

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*Starred Review* In late-1970s Bombay, four college women share a bond of friendship and dreams of a better India and a better world. Read More.. Read Less

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